By Saikou Suwareh Jabai

The high price of fish is still lingering in the markets, prompting women customers to raise concerns about the issue.

It could be recalled that three weeks ago, this reporter visited the Tanji Fish Landing Site to enquire about the prices of the different types of fish which has increased recently. Returning to the site yesterday, it was discovered that the prices have not reduced since then. There was only one fishing boat that was seen with its catch as 25 others were anchored by the beach thus indicating scarcity and the concomitant price hike.

Morr Jeng, a Senegalese boat captain, said the scarcity of fish is due to the unfavourable weather condition out at sea. “It is very cold nowadays and there are heavy winds as well as waves too. During these times, the fish usually go deep down under the sea which makes it hard for us to catch them,” said the fisherfolk.

He explained that sometimes when they go out to sea they would only get limited catch and which represents a great loss to them as they incur high expenses on fuel in every trip. This, he added, is the reason why some boats have not gone out to sea.

He, however, expressed optimism that the situation will not last long but added that their work is still affected by the high cost of fuel.

Manyima Sanneh, a fish monger, who buys wholesale and sells retail at the market, also confirmed the low catch which results in the price hike of fish.

She said a basin of fish is between D500 and D450. She was selling a set of ‘White fish’ at D150.

With these wholesale prices, she said, the retail price could be D5 for three pieces of ‘Yaboye’ or sardinella and D25 for five pieces of ‘Yaboye maroc’, another variety.

These are the prices that prevail in the Serekunda and Latrikunda markets.

As for the ‘White fish’, she said it fluctuates as most of the available stock is frozen and not fresh catch.