Clinical Management of Gender Based Violence Underway

By Awa B. Bah

The Network of Gender Based Violence (NGBV) in partnership with Action Aid International the Gambia, on Monday 28th August 2017 started a three day training programme for lecturers from the School of Nursing, at the Action Aid International Conference hall in Kanifing. The three day training programme is aimed at strengthening the capacity of twenty-five lecturers from different schools of nursing, on the clinical management of Gender Based Violence, GBA cases.

In her welcome remarks, the National Coordinator at the NGBV Haddy Mboge Barrow, said strengthening the capacity of Nursing School lecturers on clinical management of GBV cases is an important milestone in the fight to end gender based violence in the country.

‘‘Violence including sexual violence is adequately managed at clinical level. According to statistics, GBV affects women and children than men,’’ She said. Mrs. Mboge Barrow commended Action Aid International the Gambia for their technical and financial support. She concluded by urging participants to make good use of the training that will positively impact on their work.

Oumie Sissoho, Deputy Executive chairperson at Girl’s Agenda, said mainstreaming gender based violence in our educational system especially medical and nursing schools, is the smartest investment we can ever make. She said gender based violence intervention module, will adequately trickle down at all levels in our society as it will create a space of awareness that deserves the attention of everyone.

In his opening remarks, Omar Badjie, Executive Director Action Aid International said nursing schools’ lecturers are very important people in matters surrounding gender based violence. Badjie said everyone has a role to play when it comes to gender based violence at all levels.

He said the rights of women are human rights which should be highly protected to enable them work freely. He said as a nation, we should look forward to strengthening collaboration and support in the fight against gender based violence. Badjie called on stakeholders to participate effectively in ensuring the full implementation of this project as they are all central.

Lead Trainer Dr. Patrick Idoko, consultant Gynecologist at the Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital, said GBV will remain a challenge since victims do not want to talk and do not know what to do about it. He said people need to get to a point to see and know that GBV discussions are normal because it makes it easy for people to talk about it at all levels.

He said the best place to mainstream GBV is in schools and call for the lecturers to filter down the information to their medical students, as part of their fight in ending GBV.

Fallu Sowe, Programme Manager at Network of Gender Based Violence, chaired the opening ceremony.