THE END OF THE POLITICAL DRAMA AND THE WAY FORWARD

Fass Njaga Choi witnessed the most interesting political drama in its
history as security personnel took over the town by storm to carry out
the order to impose a blockade on the UDP convoy. The sheer numbers of the force with riot gears petrified many villagers, especially the
shopkeepers who closed their shops. The UDP convoy was cordoned under
a security net. The more the online media spoke about supporters of
other parties moving towards Fass, the tighter the security cordon.
Even though no curfew was declared, the security forces restricted
freedom of movement to and from the area as if there was a curfew.
Taxis were monitored and all suspicions persons closely followed.
Hence, every passer-by could not fail to realise the state of siege in
Fass Njaga Choi. Historians would record the siege of Fass Njaga Choi
to show how the state over played its hand and occupied  a whole
village for two days and wasted resources, time and energy just to
prove that it could stop a political Party from carrying out its role
as a political party.
Foroyaa is glad that the storm in the tea cup is over and that might
has been restrained by law, reason and common sense.  As the UDP
convoy took off from Fass Njaga Choi and the siege ended, the jubilant
activists of the UDP truly understand the price of personal freedom
and security and why constitutions establish safeguards to protect
them.
It is also important to know why such constitutions are to be put in
the hands of those who respect its provisions to administer the
affairs of a state.
To avoid this pathetic scenario in the future those who have
responsibility in issuing permits should carry out their functions
without fear or favour, affection or ill will.
Secondly, those who interact with them should be able to assess
whether delays are due to forgetfulness, professional incompetence,
sycophancy, or foul play as a result of instruction from the top.
Each cause of a problem must be identified so that an appropriate
remedy could be sought.
What is essential is for heads of departments, permanent secretaries
and ministers to be ready to meet complainants who are leaders of
parties and allay their fears of foul play. This will minimise such
incidents which lead to waste of time and resources.