SHOULD A JUDGE REGARD A MISDEMEANOUR AS A SERIOUS CRIME AND AN UNBAILABLE OFFENCE Justice should not only be done but should be seen to be done

It is not uncommon for a judge to deny bail applications on the premise that the crime is a serious one. The language of a magistrate or judge and the language of laymen are not supposed to be the same. Magistrates and judges are supposed to know the law and should speak the language of the law.
When judges and magistrates refer to serious crime they are understood to be talking about a felony. When they hesitate to grant bail for a serious crime they are usually confronted with a gruesome murder suspect.
Hence when a judge refers to a misdemeanour as a serious crime, one must question the basis of the remarks which cannot possibly be rooted in law.
The courts are the protectors. The police and security forces may fumble in terms of arrests, detentions and investigations. However the courts should make justice to stand on its feet and not on its head so that it would be done and is seen to be done.